Photography

Finding art in nature with #TeamGalaxy

How three creators made the environment their passion project.

A collage of three photos from #TeamGalaxy Creators: a portrait of the moon in shadow by Carol Sabbagh; a landscape photo with a man standing in the foreground by Nicholas Simenon; a portrait of a man in a blue shirt standing in the forest by Joey Solomon. A collage of three photos from #TeamGalaxy Creators: a portrait of the moon in shadow by Carol Sabbagh; a landscape photo with a man standing in the foreground by Nicholas Simenon; a portrait of a man in a blue shirt standing in the forest by Joey Solomon.

As the effects of climate change transforms life on Earth, maintaining a connection to nature is more important than ever. In honor of Earth Day, see how three #TeamGalaxy content creators used their passion for photography to explore their relationships to these changes in our natural world.

A man in silhouette, hiking on a sloped path toward the horizon. The sun is rising from the horizon. The slope is green and rocky. The sky is blue with dramatic white clouds stretching diagonally across the screen. A man in silhouette, hiking on a sloped path toward the horizon. The sun is rising from the horizon. The slope is green and rocky. The sky is blue with dramatic white clouds stretching diagonally across the screen.

Look around you

Nicholas Simenon grew up hearing about the environment, but it wasn’t until seeing “An Inconvenient Truth” at school that the climate crisis hit home. With a desire to do something to help, he eventually used his passion for photography to create a visual narrative of the world around us. “I wanted to show a piece of the environment we live in, to show why we should protect and maintain it. The purpose was to show its beauty, rather than showing the disasters.”

It took planning, preparation and a lot of motivation to hike more than 5 hours a day to find the perfect locations. Carrying an SLR camera and the Galaxy S20 Ultra, Nicholas found that he reached for the Galaxy more often, shooting over 700 pics with the phone versus 13 with the camera. “I was amazed by the convenience and possibilities to shoot,” particularly in Pro mode: “an absolute must.”

Nicholas offers this advice to other aspiring artists: “If someone wants to pursue a complex project, it has to be one that they’re passionate about. This will make it a hundred times more interesting.”

“I wanted to stop thinking about the environment and begin to do something about it.”

Nicholas Simenon, Photographer

A man in a red hat, blue jacket, gray pants and black hiking boots is building a fire next to a river. A gray tent is behind him, with a snow-capped mountain range in the distance. He is joined by a man in a black hat, orange parka, black pants and black hiking boots, who gathers supplies and tinder to help build the fire. A man in a red hat, blue jacket, gray pants and black hiking boots is building a fire next to a river. A gray tent is behind him, with a snow-capped mountain range in the distance. He is joined by a man in a black hat, orange parka, black pants and black hiking boots, who gathers supplies and tinder to help build the fire.
Pro mode
Shoot like a pro without extra equipment. Built-in settings give you control of exposure, lighting and zoom.

Tell a story in seconds

Using the Hyperlapse mode on his Galaxy S20 smartphone, Nicholas sets up his base camp in only 10 seconds.

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A head shot of Nicholas Simenon A head shot of Nicholas Simenon

FEATURING

Nicholas Simenon

Fine art photographer

An exterior night shot with the sound of crickets in the background. As the camera pans left, Carol Sabbagh is heard in narration, “Tonight I’m going to give you guys a quick demo on how to photograph the moon with a telescope and Samsung device.”  The camera moves to show a telescope positioned on a concrete patio. Sabbagh continues, “First things first, set up your telescope, and then locate the moon and bring your phone up to the eyepiece, or use an adapter to hold it in place there.” The moon is then seen from the Samsung phone screen, with the photo interface tools along the bottom of the frame. Sabbagh: “If you’re using an adapter, I recommend taking a video, but if you’re doing it handheld, then I would take photos using these settings that I’m going to show you now.” Sabbagh adjusts settings as she explains, “First, we need to adjust the shutter speed so that the moon doesn’t look too bright. Then, we need to notice if the moon is out of focus, which it is here, so I’m going to adjust the focus in manual mode. The green Focus Assist lights really help with this.” She adjusts the focus on the image. “After it’s in focus, I’m going to recenter the moon in the eyepiece so we can have some room for movement within the video.” She recanters the moon in the frame. “Next I’m going to lower the ISO a tad so that we can minimize green.” She lowers the ISO setting to 200. “And then we’re ready to hit the shutter.” She clicks the shutter. “The reason I recommend to record a video rather than an image is because there’s software online that will be able to convert your video into single frames and stack them upon one another to create one multi-dimensional image.” A still of the moon appears and Sebbagh comments, “You can check mine out here.” An exterior night shot with the sound of crickets in the background. As the camera pans left, Carol Sabbagh is heard in narration, “Tonight I’m going to give you guys a quick demo on how to photograph the moon with a telescope and Samsung device.”  The camera moves to show a telescope positioned on a concrete patio. Sabbagh continues, “First things first, set up your telescope, and then locate the moon and bring your phone up to the eyepiece, or use an adapter to hold it in place there.” The moon is then seen from the Samsung phone screen, with the photo interface tools along the bottom of the frame. Sabbagh: “If you’re using an adapter, I recommend taking a video, but if you’re doing it handheld, then I would take photos using these settings that I’m going to show you now.” Sabbagh adjusts settings as she explains, “First, we need to adjust the shutter speed so that the moon doesn’t look too bright. Then, we need to notice if the moon is out of focus, which it is here, so I’m going to adjust the focus in manual mode. The green Focus Assist lights really help with this.” She adjusts the focus on the image. “After it’s in focus, I’m going to recenter the moon in the eyepiece so we can have some room for movement within the video.” She recanters the moon in the frame. “Next I’m going to lower the ISO a tad so that we can minimize green.” She lowers the ISO setting to 200. “And then we’re ready to hit the shutter.” She clicks the shutter. “The reason I recommend to record a video rather than an image is because there’s software online that will be able to convert your video into single frames and stack them upon one another to create one multi-dimensional image.” A still of the moon appears and Sebbagh comments, “You can check mine out here.”

Look up

Growing up in light-polluted New York City, Carol Sabbagh didn’t often have a chance to gaze at the stars. She always dreamed of seeing more of the universe. Inspired by the “three stars” she used to see from her neighborhood—which is also the Korean translation of Samsung—she embarked upon a project that uses Samsung technology to illuminate the wonders of astronomy and project them on the city streets.

With a 70 lb. telescope equipped with a solar filter,1 her Galaxy S20 and an adapter to connect the phone and telescope, Carol set out for the darkened skies of Badlands National Park. Using the Pro mode with Focus Assist and Zoom features of her Galaxy camera, she was able to capture awe-inspiring images of the Milky Way, planets and other deep sky objects. “This was an experience of a lifetime, never have I felt more connected to nature.”

1Pointing your Galaxy camera directly at the sun without a solar filter can damage the image sensor and lens.

Capturing the sky

Carol Sabbagh demonstrates how she gets amazing day and night astronomical images with her telescope and her Galaxy S20 smartphone.

An exterior day shot of a telescope on a concrete patio. The camera pans up to show a Samsung phone on an adapter positioned in front of the telescope’s eyepiece. Carol Sabbagh narrates: “Imaging the sun today with my solar filter and S20.” The sun is seen from the Samsung phone screen, with photo interface tools along the bottom of the frame. Sabbagh continues, “First, I’m going to center the sun in the eyepiece. Then, I’m going to adjust the focus.” Sabbagh moves the sun to the center of the frame and adjusts the focus setting. “Now, I’m going to zoom in for some fun, see how close we can get to the sun.” Sabbagh adjusts the focus up to 10x and says, “Here are the photos.” Photos of the sun at different focal lengths are shown. “Next, I’m going to give you guys a glimpse into my editing process using the photo editor in the Gallery app.” The Galaxy screen now shows a photo with editing tools along the bottom of the frame. “Starting off with the Brightness, then I move on to Contrast so that we can pull the sun out from the background.” She adjusts the slider for Brightness and Contrast settings. “Next, we increase Saturation so that the sun’s color really pops.” She moves the Saturation slider and the image changes. Sabbagh says, “And then that’s it, we have our final photo.” The image switches between the unedited and the edited photo. “Here’s the before and after, let us know which one’s your fave.” An exterior day shot of a telescope on a concrete patio. The camera pans up to show a Samsung phone on an adapter positioned in front of the telescope’s eyepiece. Carol Sabbagh narrates: “Imaging the sun today with my solar filter and S20.” The sun is seen from the Samsung phone screen, with photo interface tools along the bottom of the frame. Sabbagh continues, “First, I’m going to center the sun in the eyepiece. Then, I’m going to adjust the focus.” Sabbagh moves the sun to the center of the frame and adjusts the focus setting. “Now, I’m going to zoom in for some fun, see how close we can get to the sun.” Sabbagh adjusts the focus up to 10x and says, “Here are the photos.” Photos of the sun at different focal lengths are shown. “Next, I’m going to give you guys a glimpse into my editing process using the photo editor in the Gallery app.” The Galaxy screen now shows a photo with editing tools along the bottom of the frame. “Starting off with the Brightness, then I move on to Contrast so that we can pull the sun out from the background.” She adjusts the slider for Brightness and Contrast settings. “Next, we increase Saturation so that the sun’s color really pops.” She moves the Saturation slider and the image changes. Sabbagh says, “And then that’s it, we have our final photo.” The image switches between the unedited and the edited photo. “Here’s the before and after, let us know which one’s your fave.”
30x Space Zoom
Bring celestial objects closer using Space Zoom. And here on Earth, you can capture clear, crisp photos from up to 100 feet away.
"I was driven to capture something out of the scope of our normal vision."

Carol Sabbagh, Photographer

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A head shot of Carol Sabbagh A head shot of Carol Sabbagh

FEATURING

Carol Sabbagh

Freelance photographer / artist

A portrait of a bare-chested, dark-haired man in black swim trunks floating face-up in a river. The man's body is in the middle of the frame and submerged in the water below the waist. His left arm is extended straight out and rests on top of the water. His right arm is bent, palm up, and touching the mossy, rocky riverbank on the right side of the frame behind his head. The water is dark green with ripples and small waves. A portrait of a bare-chested, dark-haired man in black swim trunks floating face-up in a river. The man's body is in the middle of the frame and submerged in the water below the waist. His left arm is extended straight out and rests on top of the water. His right arm is bent, palm up, and touching the mossy, rocky riverbank on the right side of the frame behind his head. The water is dark green with ripples and small waves.

Nature is for all of us

When photographer Joey Solomon was brainstorming his Passion Project, he intended to explore isolationism and the relationship between nature and the human body. “As a gay cancer survivor, it is crucial for me to make photographs that make space and pave the way for future generations of queer image makers to feel seen in all our gay glory, in luxurious nature.”

Then, the COVID-19 pandemic struck—and made travel practically impossible. Instead, he looked to nature closer to his Brooklyn, NY home: in state parks and public lands. He enlisted help from others to achieve his vision, including his Samsung gear. Joey found that the Galaxy S20 camera features were extremely helpful to his work, saying, “the device will literally assist you in finding the perfect angle for your character or object of sharpest focus.”

After working on his passion project, Joey said what he learned most is how to trust. “Asking for help is an extremely necessary and extremely human call and response in terms of making art and surviving.”

"I needed my Samsung gear and it beat my expectations."

Joey Solomon, Photographer

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A head shot of Joey Solomon A head shot of Joey Solomon

FEATURING

Joey Solomon

Freelance photographer

Explore nature for yourself #withGalaxy

Your next expedition doesn’t have to take you to far-flung locations. Simply walk out the door and take in the world around you. With the Galaxy S20, you have a full set of pro photography tools in your pocket.

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